State Board of Education approves rules allowing college athletes to earn money off of their own images

View of Doak Campbell Stadium at FSU. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Florida is one of five states to allow college athletes to receive compensation for their name, image and likeness through legislative efforts. Now, Florida’s State Board of Education has approved a set of rules to implement the changes, for the first time allowing college athletes to receive money for their names, images and likenesses.

Shortened to NIL, the legislation goes into effect July 1 and has rules for college athletes in the Florida College System, often referred to as the state’s community college system. (Regulations for Florida’s universities regarding compensation for an athlete’s name, image and likeness would come from the Florida Board of Governors.)

The state board of education approved the Florida College System rules Thursday at its regular meeting.

The rules for college athletes state that they “may earn compensation for the use of their NIL if the compensation is provided by a third party unaffiliated with the athlete’s postsecondary educational institution.”

Students must notify their college “of a contract for compensation for their NIL, in a manner designated by the postsecondary educational institution.”

As for the individual colleges, the adopted rules requires they create or adopt their own policies on how athletes are compensated. “Minimally, the policies or procedures must include the process student athletes must follow to notify the institution of a contract for compensation for their NIL,” the rule says.

These rules also prohibit a college from restricting a student athlete from receiving compensation for their NIL. But the rules also states that a student “may not enter into a contract for compensation for their NIL if the contract conflicts with a clause found in the student athlete’s team contract.”

Adopted rules also state that colleges must provide financial literacy and life skills at the beginning of a student athlete’s first and third academic years. The rule states that this is a requirement for all student athletes, not just the ones receiving compensation for their NIL.

Danielle J. Brown
Danielle J. Brown is a 2018 graduate of Florida State University, majoring in English with a focus in editing, writing, and media. While at FSU, she served as an editorial intern for International Program’s annual magazine, Nomadic Noles. Last fall, she fulfilled another editorial internship with Rowland Publishing, where she wrote for the Tallahassee Magazine, Emerald Coast Magazine, and 850 Business Magazine. She was born and raised in Tallahassee and reviews community theater productions for the Tallahassee Democrat. She spends her downtime traveling to all corners of Florida and beyond to practice lindy hop.