In six months, COVID-19 has caused more than 12,000 deaths and 650,000 infections in FL

Novel coronavirus SARS CoV2, which causes COVID-19. Microphotography by National Institute on Allergy and Infectious Diseases

On March 1, Gov. Ron DeSantis announced two coronavirus cases in Florida, one in Hillsborough County and the other in Manatee. At the time, the virus was still little-known and the public wasn’t aware that any residents had died from it.

Some six months later, Florida has reached the 12,000 mark for resident deaths and 650,000 for COVID-19 infections. The deaths and infections span all 67 counties.

As of Wednesday, the Florida Department of Health reported 12,115 deaths of Florida residents, and 652,148 infections.

To compare:

Florida ranks 3rd of the 50 states for the number of infections, following California and Texas, and 2nd of the 50 states for infections per 100,000, according to a New York Times analysis.

As to the number of deaths, Florida ranks 5th of the 50 states, behind New York, New Jersey, Texas and California. Florida ranks 15th for deaths per 100,000, the Times analysis shows.

Overall, test results are showing a decline in the percent of people who test positive for COVID-19, according to the state health department.

Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties have continued to be the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic.

Miami-Dade now has 162,433 infections and 2,740 deaths; Broward, 73,696 infections and 1,244 deaths, and Palm Beach, 43,422 infections and 1,178 deaths.

 

Diane Rado
Diane Rado has covered state and local government and public schools in six states over some 30 years, focusing on policy and investigative stories as well as legislative and political reporting. She spent most of her career at the St. Petersburg (Tampa Bay) Times and the Chicago Tribune. She has a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University and did a fellowship in education reform at the University of Michigan in 1999-2000. She is married to a journalist and has three adult children.